PARENTAL ALIENATION IS A FORM OF DOMESTIC ABUSE

According to Women’s Aid, “coercive control is an act or a pattern of acts of assault, threats, humiliation and intimidation or other abuse that is used to harm, punish, or frighten their victim It is a particularly insidious form of post-separation abuse“.

Here is why Parental Alienation MUST be included in the new Domestic Abuse Bill.

In parental alienation cases, the abuser:

• repeatedly denigrates, demeans and devalues the other parent in the presence of the child and others. They often insist a child stops calling their parent “mum” or “dad” or even prevents them talking about the other parent. They bad mouth the other parent, criticise their parenting and deny their value to their children.

• isolates the other parent from friends and family. They act as a gatekeeper, preventing children from spending time with the other parent, from talking on the phone, or messaging. They break agreed arrangements and court orders. They may insist friends “choose” between them.

• cause financial hardship by refusing to communicate or make arrangements other than through solicitors or the family court. They barter child-parenting time, offering to increase time, or threatening to reduce it, depending on money exchanged.

• interfere with parental responsibility – failing to consult on medical or educational issues and relay important health and schooling information. They may unlawfully change a child’s name in an effort to eradicate a parent from the child’s life and identity.

• make false allegations of abuse, fitness to parent, substance abuse or mental health difficulties – reporting these to the police or social services – in order to prevent a parent from being with their child. False allegations are also made to employers, friends and on social media to damage reputation and impact on financial stability and job security.

• interfere with child-parent time by arranging appointments, events and activities. They may continually text or face-time your child or ask the police to make repeated welfare checks.

• will destroy or dispose of gifts, mementos, photographs and letters given to children by a loving parent, fostering a belief that the other parent is not important or does not love a child.

• burdens their child with their emotional outbursts – crying or appearing fearful, anxious or angry when a child spends time with the other parent. In this way, a child comes to feel responsible for their parent’s emotional regulation and stability.

It is time for our Government to support ALL victims of domestic abuse. Here’s the CEO of a domestic abuse organisation spelling it out…

Because, until we protect all victims, we cannot protect all children.

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